Anti-Corruptie Buitenland Update: 27 juni t/m 3 juli 2016

Hieronder treft u de wekelijkse greep uit buitenlandse ontwikkelingen op het gebied van (anti-)corruptie in de week van 27 juni t/m 3 juli 2016.

  • Czech Republic introduces new settlement tool to encourage self-reporting (GIR)
     
  • Germany’s Federal Financial Supervisory Authority, the country’s banking watchdog, said it is making it easier for whistleblowers to come forward and report wrongdoing. (AP)
     
  • Scotland police need to overhaul its anti-corruption unit, an audit found. They say they’ll review their practices. (BBC, Herald Scotland)
     
  • U.S. prosecutors linked Chinese officials to its investigation into bribery at the U.N. (Reuters)
     
  • A former executive with Canada’s Federal Bridge Co. was charged with bribery and money laundering, and police raided his home. He didn’t appear to be contacted. (CBC)
     
  • Investors suing Petrobras over whether it knew about corruption want a ruling in their case. (Reuters)
     
  • A former Defense Department employee pleaded guilty to bribery in the “Fat Leonard” scandal, becomingthe 11th defendant in the case to do so. (AP, San Diego Union-Tribune, Washington Post)
     
  • The former U.N. General Assembly president charged with bribery died in a weightlifting accident, according to an autopsy. (CNN, Guardian)
     
  • Rep. Chakah Fattah resigned immediately, despite originally wanting to wait until his sentencing in October. (Politico, NY Times)
     
  • Peru’s newly elected president was summoned for questioning over links to the Petrobras probe in Brazil. He didn’t appear to be contacted. (TeleSUR)
     
  • A Hong Kong lawmaker was charged after allegedly taking money from a media tycoon under investigation. He said the charges were politically motivated. (SCMP)
     
  • Spain’s interior minister is under pressure to resign amid reports of a leaked recording of a conspiracy with an anti-fraud official. (Guardian, BBC)
     
  • A former head of spot currency trading at BNP Paribas is claiming the French bank dismissed him for whistleblowing, according to a court filing. BNP declined to comment. (Reuters)
     
  • World anti-doping watchdogs suspended the lab set to handle drug testing during the Rio Olympics. Meanwhile, Russian athletics authorities will back individual lawsuits by athletes against the IAAF. (NY Times, TASS)
     
  • New York prosecutors resumed their insider-trading crackdown after a setback had short-circuited their efforts. (Reuters)
     
  • Another FIFA compensations committee member quit his post. (Reuters)
     
  • A Credit Suisse AG banker allegedly transferred client money into personal accounts. The banker’s lawyer said transfers went both ways. (Bloomberg)
     
  • Ukraine didn’t pass a bill enabling the seizure of an ousted leader’s corruptly obtained assets. (OCCRP)
     
  • An Australian court rejected an appeal from a mining mogul over corruption findings against him. (Sydney Morning Herald)
     
  • An NYPD corruption case casts a harsh light on how it handles handgun permits. Top brass received training on how to handle free gifts. (AP, NY Daily News)
     
  • Indian non-profits are nervous about an anti-bribery law soon to capture them. (PTI)
     
  • Indonesia’s KPK is investigating a court official in a bribery case; he didn’t appear to be contacted. (Jakarta Post)
     
  • Peter Henning elaborates here on how the Supreme Court boosted the U.S. case against FIFA. (NY Times)
     
  • Brazil’s interim president was named in new bribery allegations. His office hasn’t commented. (Upstream)
     
  • Shares of Hypermarcas, the largest Brazilian producer of generic drugs, plunged on reports that a former senior executive admitted paying bribes to ruling coalition politicians. The former executive couldn’t be reached; the company said it isn’t a target in an investigation. (Reuters)
     
  • A court ruling reaffirmed the SFO’s bribery prosecution theories. (Thomson Reuters)
     
  • Other winners in the McDonnell Supreme Court decision include defense lawyers and a convicted New Orleans politician. Officials were notably quiet in the wake of the decision. (Law.com, Times-Picayune Atlantic)
     
  • Heads rolled in a Thai corruption sweep. (Bangkok Post)
     
  • Rampant corruption is taking place at Zimbabwean state-run agencies. (Zimbabwe Mail)
     
  • Corruption and organized crime are threatening Australia’s border. (Sydney Morning Herald)

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